Nan-Hui Jo Convicted of Child Abduction Charges; Community protests conviction of Nan-Hui Jo, survivor of domestic violence

Posted on Posted in #StandWithNanHui, news & events

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sans-serif;”>We will nurture Korean and Korean American cultural values, attitudes and practices that support these guiding principles and work individually and collectively to transform those which are destructive to family and community respect, safety, and equality.

1)  Self-Determination for Women.  Self-determination or the right of women to decide and carry out what is best for themselves as individuals, as a group and as members of families and community is primary to healthy families and communities.

2)  Home as Safe Place.  The family and home should be a place for respect, safety and the promotion of health and well-being (physical, psychological, emotional, sexual, spiritual well-being) for all members of the family.

3)  Respect for Children.  Children should be treated with respect, non-violent and non-abusive guidance, understanding of their different needs and behaviors during different stages of growth and development, and provided a home environment which ensures nurturance, safety and healthy adult role models.

4)  Healthy Communication.  Healthy communication should start with the family.  This includes concern for the common good; shared decision-making; shared responsibility over family concerns such as financial matters, household chores, care for the children, care for other family members; the confident expression of personal wants and needs; the willingness to peacefully and respectfully negotiate disagreement; and the willingness take full responsibility to admit to and correct attitudes and behavior which violate these principles.

5)  Equality of Relationship/Family Choices.  Family or relationship options for women including being single, same-gender and gender non-conforming relationships, single motherhood, marriage, divorce, and widowhood are all to be respected equally.  Children growing up in any of these family or relationships are all to be respected equally.

6)  Faith Community as Safe Place.  Faith communities including the church, temple and other institutions should be places for the promotion of respect, safety, equality and healthy communication for all.  Faith communities should provide confidential and respectful support for women and children who are experiencing abuse within their families or relationships.

7)  Gender Equality.  People of all genders including girls, boys, women, men, transgendered people, gender non-conforming people are to be valued.

8)  Class Equality.  Class, educational status, income and other forms of hierarchy and inequality contribute to  the lack of respect, safety, health, and equality within Korean American families and community.  Conditions of inequality, entitlements and privileges due to class, educational status or income must be challenged.

9)  Racial Equality.  Racial hierarchies which label and limit races and ethnicities contribute to the lack of respect, safety, health, and equality within Korean American communities and other communities of color.  Social structures and attitudes which contribute to racial hierarchy must be challenged including discrimination against Korean American women with non-Korean partners and Koreans of multiracial or ethnic descent.

10)  Community Responsibility.  Family abuses and inequalities affect the community as a whole.  Only through community-wide responsibility can these be addressed and transformed. 

Guiding Principles of KACEDA Activities

1)  We support the mission, objectives and guiding principles of KACEDA.

2)  Self-Determination for Women.  Self-determination or the right of women to decide and carry out what is best for themselves as individuals, as a group and as members of families and community is primary to healthy families and communities.  With respect to domestic violence, women and children experiencing or who have experienced domestic violence know best their experiences and needs and should inform and guide the activities of KACEDA.

3)  Partnership.  When working with women and children who are seeking help from KACEDA, we will meet them as partners.  Our role is to provide support, options, access and education to women seeking help from KACEDA.  With respect to the self-determination of women, we will not decide what attitudes or actions she must take.

4)  Protection of Safety.  We will do our best to protect the safety of women and children seeking help from KACEDA while keeping respect for self-determination.

5)  Confidentiality.  We will not violate the confidentiality of the women and children who seek help from KACEDA.*

6)  Support, Options, Access and Education.  We will provide support, options, access to resources, and education to women seeking help from KACEDA.

7)  Rights of Children.  We understand that children are hurt by violence in the family and have the least power and ability to assert their interests in these situations.  KACEDA will work to support children who are experiencing violence and to support healthy parenting.

8)  Healthy Communication.  Healthy forms of communication should start with KACEDA.  This includes concern for the common good; shared decision-making; shared responsibility over the work of KACEDA; the confident expression of personal opinions regarding the philosophy and practices of KACEDA; the willingness to peacefully and respectfully negotiate disagreement; and the willingness take full responsibility to admit to and correct attitudes and behavior which violate these principles.


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sans-serif;”>Mission of KACEDA

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sans-serif;”>KACEDA (Korean American Coalition to End Domestic Abuse) was founded in 1997 by a group of passionate Korean American women committed to address and end domestic violence in the Korean American community of the San Francisco Bay Area. KACEDA believes that everyone has the right to live with dignity and safety. Through organizing, community education & outreach, survivor support and advocacy, KACEDA’s mission is to create healthy, non-violent communities.

 

KACEDA’s Accomplishments:

Participation in development of the informational and resource booklet, Peaceful Homes, Healthy Relationships (bilingual)

Participation in development of the 2000 Korean American Domestic Violence Needs Assessment

Numerous newspaper articles and series on domestic violence in Korean American media

Community awareness events: street fairs, October Domestic Violence Awareness events

Co-founding of Shimtuh in 2000 with Korean Community Center of the East Bay and Asian Women’s Shelter
March 3, dosage
2015

For Immediate Release
Contact:

  • Hyejin Shim, Myocarditis
    KACEDA
  • Orchid Pusey, internist
    Asian Women’s Shelter
  • Nilda Valmores, My Sister’s House
  • Beverly Upton, Domestic Violence Consortium

Nan-Hui Jo Convicted of Child Abduction Charges;
Community protests conviction of Nan-Hui Jo, survivor of domestic violence

March 3, 2015—Supporters of Nan-Hui Jo express their outrage and sadness over her conviction for child abduction. With the conviction, Jo is currently being threatened with deportation, despite having pending immigration applications on file. Korean community groups, domestic violence organizations, student groups and concerned community members have rallied for Jo by attending the trial, bringing attention to the case through Facebook and Twitter (#StandWithNanHui, #WeSurvived), and circulating a petition demanding Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE) and Custom and Border Protection (CBP) to exercise their prosecutorial discretion and drop her deportation case. If Jo is deported, she could be permanently separated from her child.

Jo is a survivor of domestic violence. Jo left the United States with her child, Vitz Da, in 2009, to escape physical and emotional abuse from the child’s father. When she returned to the United States in July 2014, she was immediately arrested and separated from her child. In December 2014, Jo was tried for child abduction, and this trial resulted in a hung jury. The Yolo County District Attorney ignored the domestic violence her child’s father testified and publicly admitted to and aggressively pursued a retrial of Jo, which commenced February 20, 2015. Throughout this entire process, Jo has been denied the right to see her daughter, while the child’s father was given full custody of Vitz Da. Jo has been in jail without bail due to the immigration hold and has not seen her daughter in over seven months.

“We are extremely disappointed in the verdict. As advocates for survivors of domestic violence, we believe that this case should not have even been prosecuted. We continue to be inspired by Nan-Hui Jo’s strength throughout this time and will be continuing the fight to ensure she is reunited with her daughter,” says Hyejin Shim of Korean American Coalition to End Domestic Abuse (KACEDA), a domestic violence organization based in the Bay Area. KACEDA, Immigrant Youth Coalition, and Asian Law Caucus are asking community members to sign their petition and to call San Francisco ICE and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) field offices to drop Jo’s deportation case at bit.ly/standwithnanhui

The Community Coalition Against Domestic Violence in Sacramento and KACEDA have also set up a fundraising campaign to help cover Jo legal fees and other costs related to her appeal and pending immigration hearing and child custody hearing. To contribute to this fund, go to https://crowddefend.com/campaign/stand-with-nan-hui-2/#

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